Current and Recent Graduate Students

 

Yasser Al-Saraf
ya309@cam.ac.uk

Yasser is an economic and social history MPhil student supervised by Dr Duncan Needham. He focuses on Federal Reserve monetary policy during the Great Inflation and its role in the collapse of the Bretton Woods System. Yasser recently graduated from Warwick University with a degree in History.

 

 

Jacob Bruggeman
jab304@cam.ac.uk

Jacob Bruggeman is a graduate of Miami University ('19), where he studied history, political science, and earned an M.A. in political theory. Outside of his coursework for Cambridge's M.Phil. in Economic and Social History, Jacob is an associate editor of the Cleveland Review of Books, a book review editor at The Metropole, and a contributor to YoungVoices. Follow him on Twitter @jacob_bruggeman.

 

Robert Capodilupo
rdc43@cam.ac.uk

Robert Capodilupo is a graduate student at the University of Cambridge, where he is pursuing a master’s degree in Economic and Social History, focusing on the history of the British opium trade. He recently graduated from Harvard University, where he received a bachelor’s degree magna cum laude in Government and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. At Harvard, Robert wrote his undergraduate thesis, advised by Professor Jeffrey Miron, on the unintended consequences of Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs in the United States. He also currently works as a Policy Analyst at the Reason Foundation, a free-market-oriented think tank in Washington, DC, where his work focused on the economic benefits of drug legalization. Robert hails from North Easton, Massachusetts in the United States.

 

Harry Cook
hrlc3@cam.ac.uk

Harry is an MPhil student in Economic and Social History, supervised by Dr. Charmian Mansell. He completed his BA in History at Durham University in 2020. He wrote his undergraduate dissertation on how conflict over customary practices affected seventeenth-century woodland communities. His MPhil dissertation will build on this by examining how intergenerational tensions in the seventeenth-century shaped - and were shaped by - the English Revolution.

 

David Cummings
dgc43@cam.ac.uk

David is an Economic and Social History MPhil student supervised by Dr. Natalia Mora- Sitja. His dissertation will focus on the effects of the 1860 free trade agreement between France and the United Kingdom (Cobden-Chevalier Treaty). He previously graduated from the University of Munich with a BA in Political Science and Geography and a BSc in Economics.

 

Edward Furst
eafcf2@cam.ac.uk

Edward is an MPhil student in Economic and Social History supervised by Dr Christopher Brooke. He is interested in the development of Keynesian ideas in the twentieth century and their relation to other schools of economic thought. His research draws on the archives of John Maynard Keynes, held at Kings College Cambridge, and the Italian economist Piero Sraffa, also held at Cambridge.

 

Hannah Hassani
hh510@cam.ac.uk

Hannah is an Economic and Social History MPhil student supervised by Prof. Samita Sen. Her research focuses on post-World War II East Asian economic growth and social change. Her dissertation will compare the prevalence and opposition to labor movements in the four East Asian Tigers before their periods of sustained growth in the late twentieth century.

 

Anne Hewitt
aeh98@cam.ac.uk

Iím Anne, and Iím an MPhil student studying the occupational structure of women in the U.S between 1950 and 1970. Iím particularly interested in understanding regional variation in womenís work, and the rise of working mothers during this period. Iím completing this research with Leigh Shaw-Taylor as my supervisor and within the Cambridge Group for the History of Population and Social Structure. Prior to coming to Newnham College, Cambridge, I did my undergraduate degree in economic history at LSE. Iím originally from Virginia, U.S.A, where I have two dogs I always look forward to seeing when home. Outside of academia, Iím a violinist and enjoy cooking Korean food with friends.

 

Luke Killen
lek44@cam.ac.uk

I am an Economic and Social History M.Phil candidate at Darwin College interested in latetwentieth- century United Kingdom monetary policy. Specifically, my research will focus on Britainís infamous withdrawal from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism on September 16th, 1992 and the innovative, inflation target-led monetary policy framework implemented in response by HM Government.

 

Toby Lawes
tl491@cam.ac.uk

Toby is an Mphil Economic and Social History student supervised by Dr Duncan Needham and Dr Anthony Hotson. He is interested in Financial History and is researching Alexander Hamilton’s crisis management during the ‘Panic of 1792’. Prior to coming to Cambridge, Toby did his undergraduate degree in Economics and Economic History at the University of Edinburgh.

 

Philip Magowan
pjhm2@cam.ac.uk

Philip is an Economic and Social History MPhil student Supervised by Prof. Gareth Austin. He has worked within the coffee industry for several years, and his current research focuses on the economic development of the coffee producing industry in colonial Kenya. More broadly, Philip is interested in both historical and present trends of development within coffee growing industries; especially regarding how these industries operate global trading relationships. Philip's past research has focused on Imperial Britain's visualities of nineteenth-century China through the work of the embedded war photographer, Felice Beato.

Tigran Mheryan
tm688@cam.ac.uk

Tigran Mheryan is an MPhil student supervised by Dr. Duncan Needham. His research interests lie primarily in the areas of UK and French monetary policy, banking regulation, government debt management and, more broadly, UK and French macroeconomic policy in the second half of the 20th century. Before coming to Cambridge, Tigran studied at the …cole Normale Supťrieure and worked as a policy analyst for the French Treasury.

 

Justus Rauwald
jlzr2@cam.ac.uk

Justus is a graduate student pursuing an MPhil in Economic and Social History. He holds an MA in the History of Political Thought from UCL and Queen Mary University of London and a BA in History from King’s College London. Justus’s research focuses on Adam Smith’s moral, political and economic thought.

 

Blaise Sadler
bws25@cam.ac.uk

Blaise Sadler is an MPhil candidate in Economic and Social History, supervised by Dr Amy Erickson and Dr Adrian Leonard. He completed his BA in History at Cambridge in 2018. His undergraduate dissertation demonstrated changing uses of risk in the 17th century Financial Revolution of the City of London, by focusing on derivative trades. His MPhil research builds on this, by examining how cultural histories of the City of London can be used to explain these economic changes of new attitudes towards financial risk.

 

Benjamin Schafer
bjs63@cam.ac.uk

Benjamin is an MPhil student in Economic and Social History supervised by Dr. Pedro Ramos Pinto. His research investigates the social, economic, and political ramifications of deindustrialization in the late-twentieth century, and his dissertation will focus on post-industrial Northern England. Benjamin is a graduate of Harvard University and is the recipient of Harvardís Paul Williams Fellowship at Emmanuel College.

 

Richard Senior
rjs266@cam.ac.uk

Richard is a first-year PhD candidate studying non-bank finance in the eighteenth century, supervised by Craig Muldrew. His view is that there has traditionally been a lot of focus on 'big' events such as the foundation of the Bank of England, the South Sea Bubble and the rise of banks. There has been less focus on how everyday people borrowed and lent, how the pre-bank financial network worked and how networks formed and operated. He would be interested to discuss this or any related topics. Richard is a semi-retired practitioner and teacher of finance and capital markets. His previous degrees are from Oxford and Kingís College London.

 

Zijing Shen
zs343@cam.ac.uk

Zijing is an MPhil in Economic and Social History student supervised by Dr. Leigh Shaw- Taylor. His research focuses on the occupational structure in the area of southeast coastal China in the 20th century and pays particular attention to the career choice in the background of institutional change and economic development. Zijing previously graduated from Peking University in China with a BEng in Urban Planning and a BEc in Economics.

 

Ridhi Thukral
rt519@cam.ac.uk

Ridhi is an MPhil student in Economic and Social History, supervised by Dr David Washbrook. Her research focuses on how English contract law in British India interacted with and shaped socio-economic activity and norms, as well as the development trajectory of capitalism. Before coming to Cambridge, Ridhi completed her undergraduate degree in Philosophy and Economics at the LSE.

 

Olivia Tinker
ort23@cam.ac.uk

I am an MPhil student in Economic and Social History at Selwyn College supervised by Dr Caroline Rusterholz. I completed my undergraduate degree in History at Selwyn College. I am especially interested in the access women were able to gain to healthcare between 1880-1948 and how chronic ill health hampered women from accessing paid employment.

 

Koen van der Blij
kmv27@cam.ac.uk

Koen is an MPhil student in Economic and Social History supervised by professor Craig Muldrew. His research focuses on the accounting records of Dutch and British companies involved in the eighteenth century Atlantic slave trade. He is interested in the economic size and impact of these companies.

 

Ziming Zhu
zz398@cam.ac.uk

Ziming is an MPhil student in Economic and Social History supervised by Dr Joseph Day. He is interested in the topic of social mobility, especially social mobility measured by occupation, in modern societies. His current research focuses on social mobility and occupational changes of immigrants in nineteenth-century Britain. Prior to joining Cambridge, Ziming studied economic history at the London School of Economics.